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> What You Donít Want To Know About Our Tap Water (b
Tim12
Posted: Apr 2 2014, 01:02 PM
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I wonder if anyone has any feedback about this that they would like to share. After I found that I kept having the same algae problems that I did before, I decided to do a little more research when it comes to my increase in algae problems. Almost all of our tap water is treated to kill algae, the vast majority of municipal water treatment facilities will provide some sort of treatment. Our tap water may contain magnesium sulfate, nickel sulfate, potassium permanganate, chloramines, chlorine, iodine, and fluoride.

Most of these chemicals are used to treat "Biannual Turnover.Ē This is during the fall and spring when temperature changes. What it means is that the fluctuations in temperature cause the water at the bottom of our lakes to rise. This carries anaerobic material and silt into the water that is used by our municipal water treatment facilities. Most of these chemicals are very toxic to fish.

Despite the fact that a good portion of our municipal plumbing systems have been modernized, the majority still use lead pipes in-lines. This can create high-lead levels in our drinking water. Because of the immense cost associated with replacing ALL those pipes, they needed another solution. This led to the introduction of a phosphorus compound. This binds to the lead in the pipes and coats them so that lead does not get into our water.

Unfortunately, this had a number of different side effects. It led to high levels of phosphates in tap water. These phosphates in tap water are what cause to the rapid algae growth that most people have seen in the last few years. This means that whenever you are changing the water, you are actually adding even more phosphates to the aquarium each time. This leads to the frustrating task of having to clean your aquarium and then finding out that the algae can grow back almost immediately. I have found some good information about clearing my aquarium because I also know that using tap water is one of my only options (to keep costs down).

I have found some good suggestions that help me clear out a number of different algae. Does anyone else have any good suggestions on tips or suggestions that they could share?

I write at HomeAquaria.com

This post has been edited by Tim12 on Apr 2 2014, 01:28 PM
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